Usage

Let's say you have a long-running calculation, organized into batches:

const NUM_BATCHES = 1000

function runbatches()
    for batchidx = 1:NUM_BATCHES
        hotloop()
        # Log progress, etc.
    end
end

The hot loop calls the type-unstable function get_some_x() and passes its result to a relatively cheap calculation calc_with_x().

const NUM_ITERS_PER_BATCH = 1_000_000

function hotloop()
    for i = 1:NUM_ITERS_PER_BATCH
        x = get_some_x(i)
        calc_with_x(x)
    end
end

const xs = Any[1, 2.0, ComplexF64(3.0, 3.0)]
get_some_x(i) = xs[i % length(xs) + 1]

const result = Ref(ComplexF64(0.0, 0.0))

function calc_with_x(x)
    result[] += x
end

As get_some_x is not type-stable, calc_with_x must be dynamically dispatched, which slows down the calculation.

Sometimes it is not feasible to type-stabilize get_some_x. Catwalk.jl is here for those cases.

You mark hotloop, the outer function with the @jit macro and provide the name of the dynamically dispatched function and the argument to operate on (the API will hopefully improve in the future). You also have to add an extra argument named jitctx to the jit-ed function:

using Catwalk

@jit calc_with_x x function hotloop_jit(jitctx)
    for i = 1:NUM_ITERS_PER_BATCH
        x = get_some_x(i)
        calc_with_x(x)
    end
end

The Catwalk optimizer will provide you the jitctx context which you have to pass to the jit-ed function manually. Also, every batch needs a bit housekeeping to drive the Catwalk optimizer:

function runbatches_jit()
    jit = Catwalk.JIT() ## Also works inside a function (no eval used)
    for batch = 1:NUM_BATCHES
        Catwalk.step!(jit)
        hotloop_jit(Catwalk.ctx(jit))
    end
end

Yes, it is a bit complicated to integrate your code with Catwalk, but it may worth the effort:

result[] = ComplexF64(0, 0)
@time runbatches_jit()

# 4.608471 seconds (4.60 M allocations: 218.950 MiB, 0.56% gc time, 21.68% compilation time)

jit_result = result[]

result[] = ComplexF64(0, 0)
@time runbatches()

# 23.387341 seconds (1000.00 M allocations: 29.802 GiB, 7.71% gc time)

And the results are the same:

jit_result == result[] || error("JIT must be a no-op!")

Please note that the speedup depends on the portion of the runtime spent in dynamic dispatch, which is most likely smaller in your case than in this contrived example.

You can find this example under docs/src/usage.jl in the repo.


This page was generated using Literate.jl.